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If only they taught SQL Server in Kindergarten - Peter Ward
Author: Peter Ward Date Posted: 3/09/2007 10:01:56 PM
Bon Jovi had a hit song in the 90's with a chorus that went something along the lines of ‘The server is running slow, and your to blame, You give SQL Server a bad name’. If you look at most Information Technology courses today this parody often rings true. There are all sorts of exciting (and ‘sexier’) subjects such as Object Oriented Programming and Programming Abstraction but somehow the subject 'SQL Server 101' has been overlooked. As a result there are set of common mistakes that are made time and time again by developers that cause an application to negatively affect the performance of SQL Server. Peter Ward from WARDY IT Solutions (www.wardyit.com) will walk through some of the common Gotha’s when developing an application that accesses SQL Server and how to identify possible performance issues prior to deployment.

About the Presenter
Peter Ward is WARDY IT Solutions Chief Technical Architect. Peter is an active member in the Australian SQL Server community and President of the Queensland SQL Server User Group. Peter is a highly regarded speaker at SQL Server events throughout Australia and is a sought after SQL Server consultant and trainer, providing solutions for some of the largest SQL Server sites in Australia. Peter is a regular author for several SQL Server websites and has published numerous articles in the monthly SQL Server newsletter that he produces along with the highly acclaimed WARDY IT Solutions SQL Server Blog. Peter has been selected as a Spotlight speaker for the 2007 SQL Pass Community Summit, the largest SQL Server event in the world.

Venue: Canberra Microsoft Office, Level 2, 44 Sydney Avenue, BARTON, ACT | Duration Pizza & drinks from 5:00 pm for a 5:30 pm start. Finish approximately 7:30pm | On: Wednesday, 10 October 2007